About Slippery-Hill

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Slippery-Hill was created and is maintained by me, Larry Warren. It started as a list of fiddle tunes in the key of C and has blossomed into what you see today. For a more detailed description of how things went in the beginning, read this interview by Jon Bekoff. Please keep in mind, the second sentence of the interview is a humorous overstatement!

People kept and still are sending me rare, hard to find Old Time fiddle tunes to add to the Slippery-Hill web site.  I began adding books starting with the Milliner-Koken book. Things really took off. Roy Pilgrim gave me the idea for the Arkansas page, which has been a big hit. The Emmett Lundy page was created with all the Library of Congress tunes that had never been made commercially available. Thank John Reddick for that.

All this time, I'm hand coding all the pages in Notepad. Slippery-Hill grew to nearly 3500 tunes and it just got too big for Notepad. I needed help. After mentioning that fact at a few music festivals in the summer of 2015, the Old Time community really came through. The Brandywine Friends of Old Time Music took Slippery-Hill under its non-profit wing. Now people can make tax deductible donations to Slippery-Hill. I mean, how cool is that?

As a result, Slippery-Hill has gone through a major upgrade in late 2015 to make the site more accessible, mobile friendly, and easier to maintain. Jim Reidy, an ingenious web programmer from Trumansburg, NY, rebuilt the site through a very generous donation of his time and talent. People can now sort or search by artist, title, collection, fiddle tuning or key. That is pretty darn snazzy!

The Slippery-Hill logo was created by freelance cartoonist, illustrator and musician Jesper Deleuran of Copenhagen, Denmark.

A big thank you goes out to David Chase for the beautiful mountain background photograph. Dave, an avid hiker, took the south facing picture from the peak of Mt Eisenhower in New Hampshire. The picture represents nicely the area in which I was born and raised and also conforms to the Slippery-Hill theme.